Il Dolce Far Niente

"The sun shines not on us, but in us. The rivers flow not past, but through us, thrilling, tingling, vibrating every fiber and cell of the substance of our bodies." -John Muir
~ Thursday, April 3 ~
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awkwardsituationist:

tsingy de bemaraha national park, a unesco world heritage site in western madagascar, is home to lemurs who, with thick pads on their hands and feet, navigate this six hundred square kilometer labyrinth of three hundred foot tall razor sharp limestone pillars.

photographer stephen alvarez (previously featured) remarked, “it’s an unbelievable experience to watch them [as] they jump like acrobats from the sharp pinnacles” — a feat made more remarkable given the vast chasm bellow.

in the malagasy language, tsingy means “where one cannot walk barefoot,” and alvarez noted that that given the difficulty of the terrain, it takes an entire day to walk half a mile.

nearly impenetrable, the area is described as a refuge within paradise. lemurs, like ninety percent of the species in madagascar, are endemic to the island, and thanks to the isolation of the refuge have evolved into tsingy’s eleven distinct species, including the decken’s sifaka seen here.

Tags: Madagascar lemurs
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~ Saturday, March 1 ~
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smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Moai keep watch on Easter Island
Photo by Olivier Boëls (Brasilia, Brazil); Easter Island, Chile

Hope to see this someday

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Moai keep watch on Easter Island

Photo by Olivier Boëls (Brasilia, Brazil); Easter Island, Chile

Hope to see this someday

Tags: easter island
1,299 notes
reblogged via smithsonianmag
~ Friday, February 28 ~
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hanahbananaa:

The PCH

PCH

hanahbananaa:

The PCH

PCH

Tags: california pacific coast roadtrip
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~ Tuesday, February 25 ~
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Tags: tea rejuvenate
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~ Saturday, February 22 ~
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stumpytheorca:

Narwhal Swimming

stumpytheorca:

Narwhal Swimming

Tags: narwhal ocean
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science-junkie:

Trees On The Move As Temperature Zones Shift 3.8 Feet A Day
by Robert Krulwich

"How fast is temperature change sweeping across the Earth’s surface?"

In 2009, they came up with an answer, published in the science journal, Nature. As a global average, they said, temperatures are changing at a rate of 0.42 kilometers — or roughly, a quarter mile a year, which means that if you are standing on a patch of earth, climate zones are moving at a rate (on average) of about 3.8 feet every day.

Think about this for a moment. For birds, butterflies, bears — critters with legs and wings — catching up with your old climate (as it moves away from you at 3.8 feet a day) seems very doable. If you’re a lot smaller — a snail, a beetle — it’s harder. And if you can only wiggle, like an earthworm, it’s even rougher. [… And] Can plants do it too?

Tags: climate change ecology
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science-junkie:

A lost city reveals the grandeur of medieval African civilization

Some of the world’s greatest cities during the Middle Ages were on the eastern coast of Africa. Their ornate stone domes and soaring walls, made with ocean corals and painted a brilliant white, were wonders to the traders that visited them from Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. They were the superpowers of the Swahili Coast, and they’ve long been misunderstood by archaeologists. It’s only recently that researchers outside Africa are beginning to appreciate their importance.

Throughout the Middle Ages, great civilizations ringed the Indian Ocean. From Egypt, people could travel the Red Sea to reach the ocean, then sail south to Africa, or continue east to the Arab world and India. Then, of course, one could travel over land on the famous Silk Road from India through central Asia and into China. In reality, few people ever made that journey. But many trade goods did, passed from hand to hand in cosmopolitan cities whose cultural diversity would have made places like New York and Sao Paolo look like monocultures.

Among those great medieval cities were places like Songo Mnara, a gorgeous and bustling Swahili city built on an island off the coast of Tanzania in the fourteenth century. At a time when European cities were getting wiped out by plagues and famines, Songo Mnara was thriving. 

Read more


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~ Sunday, February 16 ~
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Tags: rumi
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reblogged via casiestevenson
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Tags: infinite rumi
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reblogged via titte-n-deactivated20140403